Tag Archives: charity

What the Extremists Don’t Understand – London 2017

Hello

The solidity of support from around the world must be frustrating for extremists.  They have been brought up to believe that destruction causes disunity, when the opposite is true.

I was initially concerned that Mr Trump should make comments on our political system, but actually what he said, is right.

“We must stop being politically correct and get down to the business of security for our people,” Trump wrote on Sunday morning. “If we don’t get smart it will only get worse.” (credit David Morgan, Reuters)

Political correctness is seen as weakness by extremists and so is giving them housing and a free life.  It is a kick in the teeth for our hospitality and further claims for political asylum should be regarded with caution.  Employ more Civil Servants.

Public service job cuts came when David Cameron and Nick Clegg entered office.  Having been insulted by a senior Civil Servant ten years before, they took revenge and aimed to cut 100,000 jobs. Unfortunately, they decimated the safety net that everyone could depend upon during times of stress. Resentment led to a way into the Civil Service by sleeper cells. Hard to believe? Try reporting an extremist.

President Trump’s comment about stopping the terror “spreading to our (US) shores” shows a fundamental misunderstanding of how extremists work. They live insidiously in a country and await instruction, so let us please learn from history.  As long ago as World War II, we had protection from the Home Guard, widely ridiculed, yet very effective against a perceived threat.

A global response committee is in place.  In the UK, we need our Civil Servants back.   Could someone please replace them?  Many public services are stretched and too many good people are on the dole.

A Muslim has suggested before in media reports that they must ‘have difficult conversations’ with people about possible extremism.  We are currently past talking.  If a political party takes action against all threats, it will be busy till Christmas. Best leave it to ‘Britain’s finest’, the police, security services and agencies working behind the scenes.

It seems like an afterthought, which it is not.  I am almost sure we gave our condolences to Kabul, Afghanistan after a car bomb targeted Embassies on 31st May. (They have their own insidious battle against the Joyless Ones, aka the Taliban.)  Bombs have the same effect as suicide bombers have around the world.  They don’t work. Their best communicators need to be there and not former politicians, well-meaning if misguided.

LucyLou

PS  I have just realised that London Bridge Tube station was involved.  It is a transport hub, yet for me, it is  near the headquarters of a charity where I worked. I have walked in the area a dozen times and marvelled at the unfamiliar foods in the market.   No-one makes eye contact and I am the only white person for miles, yet I smile as I walk.

 

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British Philanthropy in Nepal

Where better to put British philanthropy to work than in Nepal? Generations of Gurkhas have helped Britain defend itself since the early 1900’s and soldiers sending money home was a boost to the Nepalese economy.

An earthquake in April this year left about 9,000 people in shelters of corrugated iron that offer no protection from the winter cold and a generation of young men, forced to make the difficult decision to make a living in the hot desert countries like Qatar, building the football stadium or staying at home. He would be the single man out of twenty-five originally in the village to stay and rebuild his home. Now there is even less choice as the electricians and plumbers have all left to earn money abroad.

It is apparent that they live on tenterhooks, as the football stadium in Qatar is being built for the 2022 World Cup and the row about corruption continues. Meanwhile it is a lifeline for Nepal.

Could the British send electricians and plumbers to Nepal? It is a huge job, but one that Britain used to do, when it had its Empire. An army of Civil Servants was recruited to train up the locals to do the jobs and then they would move somewhere else where they were needed. They helped countries to prosper. Can Britain do that again now? This time thousands of Nepalese people will die in the winter cold, without fuel or electricity to warm their homes.

Looking at that, it is easy to understand why Nepalese families came to Britain after their military service ended. But are they happy or would they rather be back home in their communities? Has anyone asked them?

Thousands in Britain support charity. Let us take that charity to Nepal and build them a better life.

Article acknowledgement : Kieran Cooke, BBC News, Nepal

LucyLou

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